4 Key Questions to ID Your Best Prospects


2 min read
20 Dec

Freelance Writer Files: Ask these 4 key questions to ID your best customer

By Liz Craig


Let’s face it. 

Not everyone in the whole world is in the market for your product or service. There’s a select group of people or companies who are actually looking for what you have to offer.

To save wasted effort and advertising budget trying to convert non-prospects, narrow down who you’re talking to as precisely as possible. To help identify your best, most likely customer, the one who’s going to be most receptive to your message, what are the most important questions to ask? Start with these.

• Where’s the pain?

What’s the problem you can solve? And who needs your solution? If you’re a home remodeler, can you take the guesswork and angst out of choosing design options by showing the customer before and after pictures? If you’re a specialty grocery store, do you stock items some people really need but have a hard time finding, like vegan foods? If you’re a fashion boutique, do you carry cool styles trendy young single women simply can’t find in department stores?

• Who are my ideal customers?

How old are they? What’s their income range? What are their interests and hobbies? Do they have kids? How far do they live from your location? What are their favorite websites?

Advertising agencies work with lifestyle profiles of distinct sociographic groups, which include mindsets, goals, and economic and emotional indicators. Each sociographic group has distinct wants and needs. Creating profiles of your ideal customers can help you hone your message to speak to those wants and needs.

• Who’s buying from me already?

Take a look at your customer base and see who likes your product or service now. Create a lifestyle profile of those customers to get a good idea of who you need to target with your messages.

• Who are my competitors targeting?

Maybe your competitors know some good ways to appeal to your potential customers. Study their advertising or marketing messages. It’s okay to steal a marketing strategy from someone who’s using it successfully. Just don’t borrow their language or specific appeal.

Let’s say your competitors are touting their commitment to superior customer service. Well, that’s hardly new. But is there a specific strong, unique service-related feature you can advertise? One-hour turnaround? Frequent buyer discounts? A personal consultant? Longer business hours? Any unique, substantial benefit can help pull them over to your business.

• And more…

There’s more to targeting your best customers than answering these few questions. But doing it will get you started. The fact is, you can maximize your advertising and marketing budget by minimizing unanswered questions about your customers. And there’s no question, that’s very smart.